Work blows

Other stuff in other stuff.

Re: Work blows

Postby Iron Mike Sharpe » 10 Jan 2018, 15:44

Damn. All these sons visiting STL and no offer for gay sex.
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Re: Work blows

Postby Briandong79 » 10 Jan 2018, 15:45

TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?
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Re: Work blows

Postby mj3528 » 10 Jan 2018, 15:45

Iron Mike Sharpe wrote:Damn. All these sons visiting STL and no offer for gay sex.


I told you what casino I would be in, and I kept my head on a swivel for you.
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Re: Work blows

Postby Theny » 10 Jan 2018, 15:50

Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:
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Re: Work blows

Postby TheWolf » 10 Jan 2018, 16:10

Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?
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Re: Work blows

Postby Briandong79 » 10 Jan 2018, 16:10

Iron Mike Sharpe wrote:Damn. All these sons visiting STL and no offer for gay sex.


I actually thought about seeing if you wanted to meet me downtown but I knew you didn't drink and I wouldn't have had time for more than grabbing a coffee, and that sounded like too gay of a way for a man to ask another man for gay sex.
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Re: Work blows

Postby TheWolf » 10 Jan 2018, 16:12

Briandong79 wrote:
Iron Mike Sharpe wrote:Damn. All these sons visiting STL and no offer for gay sex.


I actually thought about seeing if you wanted to meet me downtown but I knew you didn't drink and I wouldn't have had time for more than grabbing a coffee, and that sounded like too gay of a way for a man to ask another man for gay sex.


This made me laugh really hard.
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Re: Work blows

Postby Iron Mike Sharpe » 10 Jan 2018, 16:14

I'm just joking.

Would have turned down the invite since I'm out west in St. Charles.
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Re: Work blows

Postby SouthernYokel » 10 Jan 2018, 16:14

TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


You have to pass a background check for law enforcement and military service that prohibits most felony convictions. The military has continually relaxed theirs. At this point I would not be that surprised if you could have felony drug convictions and still join the army
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Re: Work blows

Postby the cheese » 10 Jan 2018, 16:35

TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.
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Re: Work blows

Postby SouthernYokel » 10 Jan 2018, 16:42

the cheese wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.


Lol, once you have the license in SC, the sky is the limit on the crimes you can commit and keep your license. I seen some shit in my old days at the licensing board, buddy.
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Re: Work blows

Postby Briandong79 » 10 Jan 2018, 16:47

SouthernYokel wrote:
the cheese wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.


Lol, once you have the license in SC, the sky is the limit on the crimes you can commit and keep your license. I seen some shit in my old days at the licensing board, buddy.


A guy I know recently got disbarred for 5 years for doing some shady billing practices. He had been convicted of a pretty significant domestic abuse charge the year before and didn't even get a public reprimand.
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Re: Work blows

Postby the cheese » 10 Jan 2018, 16:49

SouthernYokel wrote:
the cheese wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.


Lol, once you have the license in SC, the sky is the limit on the crimes you can commit and keep your license. I seen some shit in my old days at the licensing board, buddy.


I know a guy who has four or five DUIs, a couple hits for possession, assault, tangentially connected to a couple fraud cases, contributing to the corruption of a minor, glancing blow in some sex trafficking, kept his license and kept making serious money even as he got downgraded from high powered securities law to a general practice for rich individuals to some increasingly scuzzy plaintiff's work, before he finally got disbarred for hitting the exacta of mishandling client funds and then trying to trade sex for legal services to a woman who was, the second time he tried to make the deal, wearing a wire. He is now an increasingly busy character actor. Much like Dong's guy, he had never had a reprimand or a negative note in his file.
Clayton Bigsby - Wed May 23, 2012 2:55 pm: i'd rather live with a guy who's kind of annoying but a nice guy than a guy who's kind of annoying and a dick
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Re: Work blows

Postby TheWolf » 10 Jan 2018, 16:51

the cheese wrote:
SouthernYokel wrote:
the cheese wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.


Lol, once you have the license in SC, the sky is the limit on the crimes you can commit and keep your license. I seen some shit in my old days at the licensing board, buddy.


I know a guy who has four or five DUIs, a couple hits for possession, assault, tangentially connected to a couple fraud cases, contributing to the corruption of a minor, glancing blow in some sex trafficking, kept his license and kept making serious money even as he got downgraded from high powered securities law to a general practice for rich individuals to some increasingly scuzzy plaintiff's work, before he finally got disbarred for hitting the exacta of mishandling client funds and then trying to trade sex for legal services to a woman who was, the second time he tried to make the deal, wearing a wire. He is now an increasingly busy character actor. Much like Dong's guy, he had never had a reprimand or a negative note in his file.


Sounds like a real classy profession you guys have there. Very high standards.
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Re: Work blows

Postby MisterTambourineMan » 10 Jan 2018, 16:51

TheWolf wrote:
the cheese wrote:
SouthernYokel wrote:
the cheese wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Theny wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:
TheWolf wrote:
Briandong79 wrote:Got to make a quick 24 hour jaunt down to St Louis for oral arguments on Tuesday. Left straight from court around 3 on Monday and drove straight down, got in just before 8, checked in, dumped off my stuff and headed to the hotel bar for dinner and a beer while watching the natty game. Sat there for a bit, apparently Rhode Island was in town to play St Louis so made small talk with some of the staff that was also at the bar. Just went safe and got a burger for dinner, nothing exciting. Headed back up to the room at halftime, got set up for the next day and then sat in bed and transcribed my argument while watching the end of the game.

Walked over to the courthouse bright and early after grabbing some breakfast from the buffet, chatted with a few of my fellow attorneys. Knew 1 of them, everyone there was an Ivy League grad except for me, so that was fun. Eventually our famous co-appellant attorney (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/gra ... his-goals/) arrived, very nice guy. Not pretentious at all, which I imagine doing a federal prison stretch does have a way of taking away that. Chatted with him after because our judge in my district is one of the strictest in the country and he has a number of cases with her on appeal. He mentioned he hoped that the fog lifted soon because he had to fly out that day because he had a meeting either today or tomorrow with Vice President Pence and Jared Kushner to talk sentencing reform. As one does.

Went back to the hotel room, lounged around in sweats for a bit, watched a little bit of TV until check out time. Drove back, uneventful, stopped at a liquor store but didn't see any cool Missouri beers. Reunited with my happy family around 5 pm. All in all, pretty successful trip.


Sounds like a trip done.

I mentioned this in the box when you first brought up that guy, but I really don't understand why it's legal for a convicted felon to practice law. If anyone has a good explanation, I'm all ears.


Because he served his time, he paid his debt to society, and allowing him to do something he is good at and potentially make a productive impact on society is better for all of us than him washing dishes at a Red Robin for the rest of his life?


Totally agree. :thumbsup:


Fair. I'm not actually saying he SHOULDN'T be allowed to. It's just one of those things that feels odd to me on its surface. Are you allowed to be a cop, federal agent, etc. after doing jail time? Or does law enforcement have different rules?


In general, at least in Oklahomistan, you have to pass a fairly extensive background check to be admitted to the bar. Once you're admitted, you can pretty much kill a guy and keep your license if you serve your time. If you mishandle client funds, try to trade sex for legal services, or attempt blackmail of any kind you're probably losing your license.


Lol, once you have the license in SC, the sky is the limit on the crimes you can commit and keep your license. I seen some shit in my old days at the licensing board, buddy.


I know a guy who has four or five DUIs, a couple hits for possession, assault, tangentially connected to a couple fraud cases, contributing to the corruption of a minor, glancing blow in some sex trafficking, kept his license and kept making serious money even as he got downgraded from high powered securities law to a general practice for rich individuals to some increasingly scuzzy plaintiff's work, before he finally got disbarred for hitting the exacta of mishandling client funds and then trying to trade sex for legal services to a woman who was, the second time he tried to make the deal, wearing a wire. He is now an increasingly busy character actor. Much like Dong's guy, he had never had a reprimand or a negative note in his file.


Sounds like a real classy profession you guys have there. Very high standards.


And we want details.
Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:10 pm Gregs Kite: You tried. Slap that on your resume.
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